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When Crisis Strikes, Digital Reasoning Takes Action

In the aftermath of Sept. 11, the federal government hired Brentwood-based Digital Reasoning to help fight terrorism with its technology.

And when the financial crisis erupted in 2008, banks realized they needed better ways to spot internal trouble spots, and turned to Digital Reasoning.

It’s an old cliché that in every crisis lies an opportunity, but for Digital Reasoning, the two biggest catastrophes in our nation’s recent history have meant just that.
“9-11 was horrific from the standpoint of the loss of life and what it did to our nation,” CEO Tim Estes said. “It has also had a strong economic loss that measured in the trillions of dollars. 2008, 2009 was the same thing in terms of economic costs, which impacted a lot of people’s retirement and future. Some of that can be traced back to bad behavior of people … This is one way to catch that data.”
Estes founded Digital Reasoning in 2000, shortly after graduating from the University of Virginia. He has about 70 employees, about 40 of whom are in Nashville and the remainder in Washington, D.C., New York and London. His company began working with the federal government in 2001, deciphering and connecting data that could aid political and military intelligence.
For example, if soldiers on the ground in Iraq were cumulatively filing hundreds reports each day, Digital Reasoning’s software could comb through each report and connect information in meaningful ways. Instead of humans spending time reading and compiling data, the software does that for them, allowing them to use the information to make decisions.

It’s an old cliché that in every crisis lies an opportunity, but for Digital Reasoning, the two biggest catastrophes in our nation’s recent history have meant just that.

“9-11 was horrific from the standpoint of the loss of life and what it did to our nation,” CEO Tim Estes said. “It has also had a strong economic loss that measured in the trillions of dollars. 2008, 2009 was the same thing in terms of economic costs, which impacted a lot of people’s retirement and future. Some of that can be traced back to bad behavior of people … This is one way to catch that data.”

Estes founded Digital Reasoning in 2000, shortly after graduating from the University of Virginia. He has about 70 employees, about 40 of whom are in Nashville and the remainder in Washington, D.C., New York and London. His company began working with the federal government in 2001, deciphering and connecting data that could aid political and military intelligence.

For example, if soldiers on the ground in Iraq were cumulatively filing hundreds reports each day, Digital Reasoning’s software could comb through each report and connect information in meaningful ways. Instead of humans spending time reading and compiling data, the software does that for them, allowing them to use the information to make decisions.

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